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Blondie, Black Sabbath & More Inducted into Hall of Fame

March 13: This Day in Rock History

In 2006 – Blondie, The Sex Pistols, Black Sabbath, Lynyrd Skynyrd and Miles Davis are inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Blondie’s performance is marred when several old members of the band try to rush the stage.

In 1970 – Police fear a Beatles connection when a terrorist organization calling itself Revolutionary Force 9 takes credit for three bombings in New York.

And in 1966 – Rod Stewart leaves Steampacket to go solo.

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This Day in Rock History

In 1987 – Paul Simon went back to No. 1 on the UK album chart with ‘Graceland’, the album stayed on the chart for 101 weeks.

In 1967 – The Beatles spent a second day at Knole Park, Sevenoaks, Kent, England to complete filming for the ‘Strawberry Fields Forever’ promotional video. The film was shot in colour, for the benefit of the US market, since UK television was still broadcasting only in black and white. Taking time out from filming John Lennon bought a 1843 poster from an antiques shop in Surrey which provided him with most the lyrics for The Beatles song ‘Being For The Benefit Of Mr Kite’.

And in 1978 – Talking Heads made their UK TV debut on the ‘The Old Grey Whistle Test’.

 

Paul McCartney and Sony Settle Beatles Catalog Suit

Back in January of this year, Paul McCartney sued Sony over the rights to The Beatles catalog. McCartney did so to ensure he would not be in breach when he decided to reclaim his rights.

It appears that McCartney and Sony have settled the lawsuit, according to The Hollywood Reporter, though the details of the settlement are unknown.

 

“The parties have resolved this matter by entering into a confidential settlement agreement and jointly request that the Court enters the enclosed proposed order dismissing the above-referenced action without prejudice,” Michael Jacobs, McCartney’s attorney told U.S. District Judge Edgardo Ramos.

The rights to the Beatles catalog was famously fought over between McCartney and Michael Jackson in 1985, where the latter outbid him during the sale. Jackson bought ATV, the company that had owned the copyrights to the Beatles songs for $47 million.

Jackson would later share half of the rights to Sony for $100 million. After the King of Pop’s death in 2009, his estate sold the other half to Sony for $750 million.

McCartney’s case stems from Section 304(c) of the Copyright Act of 1976. Section 304(c) states that authors can reclaim their ownership interests in any works assigned by them prior to January 1, 1978, after 56 years. Under this law, McCartney’s songs, written with John Lennon, would become available to him in 2018.

Attorneys for both parties declined further comment.

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